Amazon may be facing antitrust probe from New York attorney general

This is just one of a long list of investigations into Big Tech's potential monopoly power. Inside an Amazon warehouse in Massachusetts. Ben Fox Rubin/CNET Amazon appears to be facing even more antitrust troubles. New York Attorney General Letitia James is joining the investigations into Amazon's market power, according to Bloomberg. The publication said Monday that James' office is partnering with California's attorney general and the Federal Trade Commission on their investigations into the e-commerce giant. The news comes after Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos was grilled last week before a US House antitrust subcommittee about his company's allegedly unfair practices against smaller sellers on its platform. He appeared along with the CEOs of Apple, Facebook and Alphabet, who also faced harsh questioning about their business practices. CNET Now If you subscribe to only one CNET newsletter, this is it. Get editors' top picks of the day's most interesting reviews, news stories and videos. There's already a slew of ongoing antitrust investigations into Amazon, Facebook, Alphabet and Apple by Congress, the FTC, the Department of Justice, the European Union and state attorneys general. Previous reports have revealed Amazon investigations by the attorneys general in California and Washington, as well as the Federal Trade Commission, though Amazon hasn't publicly confirmed these investigations. Representatives for both Amazon and the New York attorney general separately declined to comment. The New York AG has already been taking a critical eye at Amazon. In April, the attorney general's office claimed in a letter to Amazon that the company may have violated the state's whistleblower laws when it fired activist employee Christian Smalls. In the letter, the attorney general also claimed Amazon may have broken federal and state safety guidelines by providing "inadequate" protections for New York warehouse workers. See also: Prime Day 2020: Here's what we know about Amazon's big sale Watch this: Tech CEOs vs. Congress: Everything you need to know

Amazon may be facing antitrust probe from New York attorney general
This is just one of a long list of investigations into Big Tech's potential monopoly power. Inside an Amazon warehouse in Massachusetts. Ben Fox Rubin/CNET Amazon appears to be facing even more antitrust troubles. New York Attorney General Letitia James is joining the investigations into Amazon's market power, according to Bloomberg. The publication said Monday that James' office is partnering with California's attorney general and the Federal Trade Commission on their investigations into the e-commerce giant. The news comes after Amazon CEO and founder Jeff Bezos was grilled last week before a US House antitrust subcommittee about his company's allegedly unfair practices against smaller sellers on its platform. He appeared along with the CEOs of Apple, Facebook and Alphabet, who also faced harsh questioning about their business practices. CNET Now If you subscribe to only one CNET newsletter, this is it. Get editors' top picks of the day's most interesting reviews, news stories and videos. There's already a slew of ongoing antitrust investigations into Amazon, Facebook, Alphabet and Apple by Congress, the FTC, the Department of Justice, the European Union and state attorneys general. Previous reports have revealed Amazon investigations by the attorneys general in California and Washington, as well as the Federal Trade Commission, though Amazon hasn't publicly confirmed these investigations. Representatives for both Amazon and the New York attorney general separately declined to comment. The New York AG has already been taking a critical eye at Amazon. In April, the attorney general's office claimed in a letter to Amazon that the company may have violated the state's whistleblower laws when it fired activist employee Christian Smalls. In the letter, the attorney general also claimed Amazon may have broken federal and state safety guidelines by providing "inadequate" protections for New York warehouse workers. See also: Prime Day 2020: Here's what we know about Amazon's big sale Watch this: Tech CEOs vs. Congress: Everything you need to know